Parents’ worst nightmare — the other ‘F’ word — not as bad as you think

Breast is best  — it is said and so it is, when it comes to feeding the newborn. Breast milk has amazing benefits for the baby and there ought to be little doubt behind that.

Time to talk about the another dreaded ‘F’ word — formula — which happens to scare the daylights out of parents.

What has been our experience?

Well, we have been just blessed with a baby boy. Oh yes, he is born after an emergency c-section operation due to some complexities.

The baby’s mother is not able to breastfeed him and we opted for formula milk out of sheer necessity when everything else failed.

We have been told breastfeeding will prevent my wife from:

  • breast cancer
  • ovarian cancer
  • osteoporosis
  • post-partum depression

What about nutrient count?

It is said that breast milk is rich in iron and is going to boost the immunity of my child, something formula milk is simply incapable of. But, whether kids fed with formula milk grow up to be healthy individuals remains to be seen.

Seems my knowledge points otherwise.

My baby- you are safe for Reason One

Benefits of breast-feeding ‘overstated,’ says sibling study

When it comes to nutrition for infants, the medical community largely agrees that “breast is best.” But a new study in siblings seeking to uncover potential biases suggests breastfeeding may be no more beneficial than bottle feeding for many long-term health outcomes.

The research, led by Cynthia Colen, assistant professor of sociology at Ohio State University, was recently published in the journal Social Science & Medicine.

Colen says that previous studies on the topic fall prey to selection bias, in that they “either do not or cannot statistically control for factors such as race, age, family income, mother’s employment — things we know that can affect both breastfeeding and health outcomes.”

In the latest study, the team included an analysis of outcomes from families of different races and socioeconomic backgrounds for comparison and found that their results matched those of other studies advocating that the benefits of breast-feeding outweigh those of bottle feeding.

The researchers also assessed health and education benefits of the different feeding approaches for children between the ages of 4 and 14 years old, which extends beyond the typical immediate benefits studied in past studies.

Colen says the declaration from federal officials that breastfeeding for the first 6 months of an infant’s life is a national priority could stigmatize women who are not able to breast-feed their babies. She adds:

“I’m not saying breast-feeding is not beneficial, especially for boosting nutrition and immunity in newborns. But if we really want to improve maternal and child health in this country, let’s also focus on things that can really do that in the long term — like subsidized day care, better maternity leave policies and more employment opportunities for low-income mothers that pay a living wage, for example.”

My baby- you are safe for Reason Two

Benefits of breast-feeding ‘overstated,’ says sibling study

When it comes to nutrition for infants, the medical community largely agrees that “breast is best.” But a new study in siblings seeking to uncover potential biases suggests breastfeeding may be no more beneficial than bottle feeding for many long-term health outcomes.

The research, led by Cynthia Colen, assistant professor of sociology at Ohio State University, was recently published in the journal Social Science & Medicine.

Colen says that previous studies on the topic fall prey to selection bias, in that they “either do not or cannot statistically control for factors such as race, age, family income, mother’s employment — things we know that can affect both breastfeeding and health outcomes.”

In the latest study, the team included an analysis of outcomes from families of different races and socioeconomic backgrounds for comparison and found that their results matched those of other studies advocating that the benefits of breast-feeding outweigh those of bottle-feeding.

The researchers also assessed health and education benefits of the different feeding approaches for children between the ages of 4 and 14 years old, which extends beyond the typical immediate benefits studied in past studies.

I Came across an interesting piece busting certain myths pertaining to breastfeeding:

Myth: Formula doesn’t provide complete nutrition.

Coming back to ‘breast is best’. It doesn’t provide certain supplements, such as Vitamin D and the same has to be administrated in the form of supplements to breast-fed babies. Formula milk in turn, is rich in the same along with omega-3 fatty acid DHA, which aids in the development of baby’s brain, nervous system, and eyes.

Myth: You have to choose between breast milk vs. Formula.

Why, one may ask? Why does it have to be this versus that? Why cannot it be a combination of the two? There are mothers who combine breastfeeding with formula milk. In fact, mothers could breastfeed for longer if they opted for the above solution: here is the survey that supports the above claim

Myth: Your breast milk supply will dry up if you supplement with formula.

It is quite amazing that body increases breast milk production when you increase feeding frequency. However, there is no support for the claim that your milk supply will reduce if you opt for adding formula milk to the baby’s diet.

Myth: Formula-fed babies do not fare as well as breast-fed babies in long-term measures of health and intelligence.

Okay, I cite a number of studies conducted by some of the leading institutions and you got to have a look at the same and get amazed!

Original post: http://www.xosam.com/parents-worst-nightmare-the-other-f-word-not-as-bad-as-you-think/

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